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Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 378 in 2008–2009 to 310 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 312 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over increased from 80 in 2008–2009 to 120 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 100 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests decreased from 139 in 2008–2009 to 123 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 135 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 597 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 553 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 547 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 64 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (177 requests), 28 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (77 requests) and 8 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (21 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 43 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 33 percent 31–60 days late, 5 percent 61–90 days late and 19 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 40 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (83 requests), 14 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (28 requests) and 46 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (94 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 37 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 17 percent 31–60 days late, 12 percent 61–90 days late and 34 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada reported taking nine extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 10 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for 91–120 days and two in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for 121–150 days and one in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for 151–180 days and 13 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took four extensions for more than 180 days and 11 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for an unspecified time and 7 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaint graph (on the top) shows two deemed refusal complaints resolved, one not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 13 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 15 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 9 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 7 discontinued and 2 pending, for a total of 18 complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaint graph (on the bottom) shows two time extensions complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2009–2010, there were three time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 6 time extension complaints resolved, 1 not substantiated, 0 discontinued and 3 pending, for a total of 10 complaints.

Canada Revenue Agency

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Canada Revenue Agency's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 1,770 in 2008–2009 to 1,798 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 2,589. Requests carried over increased from 690 in 2008–2009 to 916 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 1,043. Consultation requests decreased from 125 in 2008–2009 to 83 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 116 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 2,585 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 2,797 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 3,748 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Canada Revenue Agency to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 63 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (731 requests), 29 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (335 requests) and 8 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (92 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 59 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 21 percent 31–60 days late, 11 percent 61–90 days late and 10 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 45 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (799 requests) 32 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (564 requests) and 23 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (400 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 48 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 18 percent 31–60 days late, 12 percent 61–90 days late and 23 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Canada Revenue Agency. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Canada Revenue Agency reported taking 167 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 576 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 26 extensions for 91–120 days and 64 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 11 extensions for 121–150 days and 17 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 84 extensions for 151–180 days and 9 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 58 extensions for more than 180 days and 15 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for an unspecified time and zero in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Canada Revenue Agency. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaint graph (on the top) shows 17 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 3 not substantiated, 4 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 24 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 23 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 10 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 33 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 152 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 103 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 256 complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaint graph (on the bottom) shows 90 time extension complaints resolved, 2 not substantiated, 3 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 96 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 12 time extension complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 13 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 12 time extensions complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 7 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 19 complaints.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 472 in 2008–2009 to 347 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 351 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over increased from 56 in 2008–2009 to 201 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 208. Consultation requests decreased from 74 in 2008–2009 to 64 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 77 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 602 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 612 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 636 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 53 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (148 requests), 20 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (58 requests) and 27 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (77 requests). This section is then broken down to show that 53 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 18 percent 31–60 days late, 8 percent 61–90 days late and 21 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 54 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (134 requests), 27 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (67 requests) and 19 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (49 requests). This section is then broken down to show that 63 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 13 percent 31–60 days late, 17 percent 61–90 days late and 7 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency reported taking 86 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 103 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 7 extensions for 91–120 days and 11 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 0 extensions for 121–150 days and 13 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 7 extensions for 151–180 days and 1 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 4 extensions for more than 180 days and 0 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 0 extensions for an unspecified time and 1 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal graph (on the top) shows three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, three discontinued and zero pending, for a total of six complaints. In 2009–2010, there were five deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of six complaints. In 2010–2011, there were two deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, two discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension graph (on the bottom) shows one time extension complaint resolved, three not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2009–2010, there were two time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints.

Canadian Heritage

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Canadian Heritage's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 294 in 2008–2009 to 235 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 253 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over increased from 93 in 2008–2009 to 155 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 137 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests increased from 106 in 2008–2009 to 115 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 110 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 493 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 505 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 500 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Canadian Heritage to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 71 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (161 requests), 4 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (9 requests) and 25 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (57 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 47 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 19 percent 31–60 days late, 16 percent 61–90 days late and 18 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 78 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (164 requests), 22 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (45 requests) and 0 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (0 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 0 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 0 percent 31–60 days late, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 0 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Canadian Heritage. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Canadian Heritage reported taking 41 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 39 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 14 extensions for 91–120 days and 9 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 1 extension for 121–150 days and 6 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 6 extensions for 151–180 days and 11 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for more than 180 days, and five in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for an unspecified time and 1 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Canadian Heritage. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows 11 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 12 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were five deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2010–2011, there was one resolved deemed refusal complaint, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaint graph (on the bottom) shows three time extension complaints resolved, two not substantiated, four discontinued and zero pending, for a total of nine complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, four not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints.

Canadian International Development Agency

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Canadian International Development Agency's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 150 in 2008–2009 to 155 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 205. Requests carried over decreased from 102 in 2008–2009 to 84 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 52. Consultation requests decreased from 86 in 2008–2009 to 61 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 111 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 338 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 300 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 368 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Canadian International Development Agency to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 50 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (76 requests), 17 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (25 requests) and 33 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (49 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 56 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 26 percent 31–60 days late, 4 percent 61–90 days late and 15 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 58 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (87 requests), 36 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (53 requests) and 6 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (9 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 44 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 22 percent 31–60 days late, 22 percent 61–90 days late and 11 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Canadian International Development Agency. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Canadian International Development Agency reported taking 11 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 7 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 5 extensions for 91–120 days and 24 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 2 extensions for 121–150 days and 5 extensions in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 4 extensions for 151–180 days, and 5 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 8 extensions for more than 180 days and 23 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 11 extensions for an unspecified time and 8 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Canadian International Development Agency. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows two deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, five discontinued and zero pending, for a total of seven complaints. In 2009–2010, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, two discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the top) shows two time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 6 time extension complaints resolved, 3 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 10 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints.

Canadian Security Intelligence Service

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 150 in 2008–2009 to 156 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 263. Requests carried over increased from 37 in 2008–2009 to 47 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 33 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests increased from 182 in 2008–2009 to 274 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 257 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 369 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 447 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 553 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 62 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (63 requests), 17 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (18 requests) and 21 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (22 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 49 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 19 percent 31–60 days late, 7 percent 61–90 days late and 26 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 48 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (110 requests), 48 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (108 requests) and 4 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (9 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 89 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 0 percent 31–60 days late, 11 percent 61–90 days late and 0 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Canadian Security Intelligence Service reported taking 21 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 49 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 4 extensions for 91–120 days and 34 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for 121–150 days and three in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took two extensions for 151–180 days and three in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for more than 180 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for an unspecified time and zero in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaint graph (on the top) shows three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints. In 2010–2011, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows two time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and one pending, for a total of two complaints.

Correctional Service of Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Correctional Service of Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 408 in 2008–2009 to 480 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 604. Requests carried over decreased from 126 in 2008–2009 to 76 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 84 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests increased from 69 in 2008–2009 to 86 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 92.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 603 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 642 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 780 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Correctional Service of Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 42 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (157 requests), 14 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (51 requests) and 44 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (169 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 49 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 23 percent 31–60 days late, 7 percent 61–90 days late and 22 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the left) shows 45 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (213 requests), 43 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (206 requests) and 12 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (58 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 55 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 21 percent 31–60 days, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 24 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Correctional Service of Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Correctional Service of Canada reported taking 16 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 36 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for 91–120 days and 8 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for 121–150 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 0 extensions for 151–180 days and 8 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for more than 180 days and one in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took eight extensions for an unspecified time and five in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Correctional Service of Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows eight deemed refusal complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of nine complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 6 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 4 pending, for a total of 11 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 6 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 4 not substantiated, 4 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 14 complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows zero time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, three discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint. In 2010–2011, there were two time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, one discontinued and one pending, for a total of four complaints.

Environment Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Environment Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 892 in 2008–2009 to 890 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 1,128 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over decreased from 276 in 2008–2009 to 254 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 215. Consultation requests decreased from 212 in 2008–2009 to 117 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 159 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 1,380 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 1,261 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 1,502 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Environment Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 78 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (556 requests), 2 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (16 requests) and 20 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (147 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 44 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 20 percent 31–60 days late, 8 percent 61–90 days late and 28 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 83 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (827 requests), 10 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (103 requests) and 7 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (73 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 55 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 15 percent 31–60 days late, 12 percent 61–90 days late and 18 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Environment Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Environment Canada reported taking 29 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 97 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 11 extensions for 91–120 days and 61 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for 121–150 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took two extensions for 151–180 days and four in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for more than 180 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 4 extensions for an unspecified time and 28 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Environment Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows 13 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 1 not substantiated, 2 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 17 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were seven deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of eight complaints. In 2010–2011, there were two deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows 5 time extension complaints resolved, 12 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 18 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were two time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, four not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Fisheries and Oceans Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 396 in 2008–2009 to 379 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 368. Requests carried over decreased from 103 in 2008–2009 to 89 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 67. Consultation requests decreased from 155 in 2008–2009 to 128 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 165 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 654 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 596 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 600 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Fisheries and Oceans Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 73 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (233 requests), 19 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (62 requests) and 8 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (27 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 63 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 19 percent 31–60 days late, 15 percent 61–90 days late and 4 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 78 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (238 requests), 24 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (64 requests) and 1 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (3 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 67 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 0 percent 31–60 days late, 33 percent 61–90 days late and 0 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada reported taking 40 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 19 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 1 extension for 91–120 days and 10 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took two extensions for 121–150 days and four in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 29 extensions for 151–180 days and 12 extensions in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 8 extensions for more than 180 days and 22 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 25 extensions for an unspecified time and 24 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, two discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2009–2010, there were four deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2010–2011, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows 7 time extension complaints resolved, 3 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 11 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of 1 complaint. In 2010–2011, there was one time extension complaint resolved, three not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 665 in 2008–2009 to 638 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 798 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over decreased from 459 in 2008–2009 to 387 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 389 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests decreased from 1,039 in 2008–2009 to 812 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 1,049 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 2,163 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 1,837 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 2,236 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 42 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (183 requests), 21 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (90 requests) and 37 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (163 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 42 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 20 percent 31–60 days late, 7 percent 61–90 days late and 32 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 59 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (264 requests), 31 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (137 requests) and 10 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (46 requests). This last section is then broken to show that 50 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 28 percent 31–60 days late, 9 percent 61–90 days and 13 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada reported taking 96 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 93 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 66 extensions for 91–120 days and 24 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 19 extensions for 121–150 days and 46 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 27 extensions for 151–180 days and 46 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 67 extensions for more than 180 days and 64 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 9 extensions for an unspecified time and 28 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows 11 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 1 not substantiated, 7 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 19 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were four deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2010–2011, there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, one not substantiated, one discontinued and one pending, for a total of three complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows 13 time extension complaints resolved, 1 not substantiated, 24 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 39 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 71 time extension complaints resolved, 10 not substantiated, 4 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 85 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were two time extension complaints resolved, five not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of seven complaints.

Health Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Health Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 1,158 in 2008–2009 to 1,481 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 1602. Requests carried over increased from 359 in 2008–2009 to 567 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 545 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests decreased from 204 in 2008–2009 to 203 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 243 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 1,721 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 2,251 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 2,390 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Health Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 29 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (195 requests), 50 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (327 requests) and 21 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (142 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 32 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 16 percent 31–60 days late, 13 percent 61–90 days late and 39 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 66 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (712 requests), 25 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (267 requests) and 9 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (97 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 29 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 16 percent 31–60 days late, 9 percent 61–90 days late and 45 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts one, on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Health Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Health Canada reported taking 327 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 127 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 76 extensions for 91–120 days and 16 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 69 extensions for 121–150 days and 5 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 10 extensions for 151–180 days and 15 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 3 extensions for more than 180 days and 43 extensions in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 41 extensions for an unspecified time and 357 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Health Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows 17 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 5 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 22 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 14 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 6 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 21 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 13 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 3 discontinued and 17 pending, for a total of 33 complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows 4 time extension complaints resolved, 1 not substantiated, 6 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 11 complaints. In 2009–2010, there was one time extension complaint resolved, two not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2010–2011, there was one time extension complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, two discontinued and one pending, for a total of four complaints.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received increased from 295 in 2008–2009 to 400 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 492. Requests carried over decreased from 78 in 2008–2009 to 61 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 46. Consultation requests decreased from 129 in 2008–2009 to 91 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 148 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 502 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 552 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 686 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Human Resources and Skills Development Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 77 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (175 requests), 15 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (33 requests) and 8 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (19 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 88 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 12 percent 31–60 days late, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 0 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 83 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (356 requests), 15 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (64 requests) and 2 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (9 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 56 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 33 percent 31–60 days late, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 11 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Human Resource and Skills Development Canada reported taking 39 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 35 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 20 extensions for 91–120 days and 16 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 10 extensions for 121–150 days and 19 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took four extensions for 151–180 days and two in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took five extensions for more than 180 days and two in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took three extensions for an unspecified time and zero in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there were two deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending for a total of three complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints. In 2010–2011, there were three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there was one time extension complaint resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2009–2010, there were two time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 9 time extension complaints resolved, 3 not substantiated, 1 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 13 complaints.

National Defence

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of National Defence's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 1,669 in 2008–2009 to 1,142 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 1,483 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over decreased from 674 in 2008–2009 to 582 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 306. Consultation requests decreased from 440 in 2008–2009 to 353 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 485 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 2,783 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 2,077 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 2,274 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took National Defence to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 44 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (538 requests), 52 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (637 requests) and 4 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (51 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 39 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 24 percent 31–60 days late, 20 percent 61–90 days late and 18 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 56 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (648 requests), 38 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (450 requests) and 6 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days, with no extension (75 requests). This last section is then broken down to show 53 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 24 percent 31–60 days late, 8 percent 61–90 days late and 15 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by National Defence. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

National Defence reported taking 193 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 196 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 110 extensions for 91–120 days and 91 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 35 extensions for 121–150 days and 52 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 328 extensions for 151–180 days and 28 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 278 extensions for more than 180 days and 19 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009 it took 51 extensions for an unspecified time and 37 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against National Defence. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there were 19 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 23 not substantiated, 0 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 42 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 14 deemed refusal complaints resolved, 2 not substantiated, 3 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 19 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were three deemed refusal complaints resolved, two not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of six complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there were 86 time extension complaints resolved, 10 not substantiated, 42 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 138 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 27 time extension complaints resolved, 11 not substantiated, 12 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 50 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 9 time extension complaints resolved, 3 not substantiated, 5 discontinued and 4 pending, for a total of 21 complaints.

Natural Resources Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Natural Resources Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 365 in 2008–2009 to 242 in 2009–2010 and then increased in 2010–2011, to 354. Requests carried over decreased from 72 in 2008–2009 to 67 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 41. Consultation requests decreased from 170 in 2008–2009 to 111 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 147 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 607 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 420 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 542 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Natural Resources Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 53 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (186 requests), 15 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (54 requests) and 32 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (111 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 54 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 21 percent 31–60 days late, 17 percent 61–90 days late and 18 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 71 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (229 requests), 20 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (65 requests) and 9 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (28 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 79 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 7 percent 31–60 days late, 4 percent 61–90 days late and 11 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Natural Resources Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Natural Resources Canada reported taking 11 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 22 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 9 extensions for 91–120 days and 41 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 0 extensions for 121–150 days and 12 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for 151–180 days and three in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for more than 180 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 2 extensions for an unspecified time and 14 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Natural Resources Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2009–2010, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint. In 2010–2011, there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of zero complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there were zero time extension complaints resolved, four not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of four complaints. In 2009–2010, there was one time extension complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint. In 2010–2011, there was one time extension complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints.

Privy Council Office

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Privy Council Office's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 650 in 2008–2009 to 459 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 647 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over decreased from 260 in 2008–2009 to 238 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 121. Consultation requests decreased from 405 in 2008–2009 to 353 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 490 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 1,315 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 1,020 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 1,258 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Privy Council Office to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 63 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (303 requests), 27 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (133 requests) and 10 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (50 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 20 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 18 percent 31–60 days late, 18 percent 61–90 days late and 44 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 74 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (409 requests), 26 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (143 requests) and 0 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (1 request). This last section is then broken down to show that 0 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 0 percent 31–60 days late, 100 percent 61–90 days late and 0 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Privy Council Office. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Privy Council Office reported taking 25 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 22 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 71 extensions for 91–120 days and 11 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 76 extensions for 121–150 days and 2 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 50 extensions for 151–180 days and 0 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 40 extensions for more than 180 days and 14 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for an unspecified time and six in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Privy Council Office. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there were three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, three discontinued and zero pending, for a total of six complaints. In 2009–2010, there were three deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2010–2011, there were two deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there were 18 time extension complaints resolved, 7 not substantiated, 83 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 108 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were 13 time extension complaints resolved, 23 not substantiated, 16 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 52 complaints. In 2010–2011, there were three time extension complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and one pending, for a total of five complaints.

Public Safety Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Public Safety Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 235 in 2008–2009 to 208 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 298 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over decreased from 59 in 2008–2009 to 53 in 2009–2010 and decreased again in 2010–2011, to 28. Consultation requests decreased from 198 in 2008–2009 to 136 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 223 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 492 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 397 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 549 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Public Safety Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 74 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (137 requests), 21 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (39 requests) and 5 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (10 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 40 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 50 percent 31–60 days late, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 10 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 72 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (178 requests), 23 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (55 requests) and 5 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (11 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 45 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 27 percent 31–60 days late, 0 percent 61–90 days late and 27 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Public Safety Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Public Safety Canada reported taking 25 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 26 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 10 extensions for 91–120 days and 5 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took two extensions for 121–150 days and eight in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 29 extensions for 151–180 days and 7 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 2 extensions for more than 180 days and 36 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took one extension for an unspecified time and one in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Public Safety Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there were zero deemed refusal complaints resolved, two not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of two complaints. In 2009–2010, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint. In 2010–2011, there was one deemed refusal complaint resolved, zero not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of one complaint.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there were 3 time extension complaints resolved, 0 not substantiated, 8 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 11 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were zero time extension complaints resolved, three not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of three complaints. In 2010–2011, there were 3 time extension complaints resolved, 2 not substantiated, 4 discontinued and 1 pending, for a total of 10 complaints.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 2,008 in 2008–2009 to 1,547 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 1,657 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over increased from 256 in 2008–2009 to 286 in 2009–2010 and then decreased to 196 in 2010–2011. Consultation requests increased from 531 in 2008–2009 to 533 in 2009–2010 and then increased again in 2010–2011, to 625.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 2,795 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 2,366 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 2,478 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 79 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (1,581 requests), 9 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (176 requests) and 12 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (236 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 50 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 25 percent 31–60 days late, 9 percent 61–90 days late and 17 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 85 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (1,293 requests), 8 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (128 requests) and 7 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (102 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 46 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 35 percent 31–60 days late, 13 percent 61–90 days late and 6 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police reported taking 44 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 77 extensions in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 4 extensions for 91–120 days and 16 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took eight extensions for 121–150 days and zero in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took nine extensions for 151–180 days and eight in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took three extensions for more than 180 days and one in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took zero extensions for an unspecified time and zero in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fours bars representing whether the complaint was resolved, not substantiated, discontinued or pending.

The 2008–2009 deemed refusal complaints graph (on the top) shows there were six deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, one discontinued and zero pending, for a total of seven complaints. In 2009–2010, there were four deemed refusal complaints resolved, one not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2010–2011, there were four deemed refusal complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, five discontinued and zero pending, for a total of nine complaints.

The 2008–2009 time extension complaints graph (on the bottom) shows there was 1 time extension complaint resolved, 20 not substantiated, 0 discontinued and 0 pending, for a total of 21 complaints. In 2009–2010, there were three time extension complaints resolved, two not substantiated, zero discontinued and zero pending, for a total of five complaints. In 2010–2011, there were two time extension complaints resolved, zero not substantiated, two discontinued and one pending, for a total of five complaints.

Transport Canada

Access to information workload, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic is a horizontal bar chart that represents the sources of Transport Canada's workload. The chart is broken down into three sections, each representing a fiscal year, with 2008–2009 on top, followed by 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 on the bottom. Each section has four bars, representing new access to information requests received, requests carried over from the previous fiscal year, consultation requests received, and the total of the three.

The graph shows that the number of new access requests received decreased from 1,069 in 2008–2009 to 552 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 573 in 2010–2011. Requests carried over increased from 221 in 2008–2009 to 250 in 2009–2010 and increased again in 2010–2011, to 347. Consultation requests decreased from 178 in 2008–2009 to 167 in 2009–2010 and then increased to 230 in 2010–2011.

The total workload for 2008–2009 was 1,468 files. The total for 2009–2010 was 969 files. The total for 2010–2011 was 1,150 files.

How long it took to complete new requests, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

These are two side-by-side pie charts that represent how long it took Transport Canada to complete new access to information requests, with 2008–2009 on the left and 2010–2011 on the right. Each pie has three sections. Clockwise from the top right, the first section represents the number of requests the institution completed within 30 days, the second section the number of requests it completed in more than 30 days when it took an extension, and the third the number of requests it completed late (after 30 days) when it did not take an extension. This third section is then broken down to show the percentage of requests that were completed between 1 and 30 days late, between 31 and 60 days late, between 61 and 90 days late and more than 90 days late.

The 2008–2009 pie chart (on the left) shows 79 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (672 requests), 10 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (85 requests) and 12 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (106 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 52 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 22 percent 31–60 days late, 11 percent 61–90 days late and 15 percent more than 90 days late.

The 2010–2011 pie chart (on the right) shows 59 percent of the pie allocated to requests completed within 30 days (206 requests), 7 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with an extension (26 requests) and 34 percent to requests completed in more than 30 days with no extension (120 requests). This last section is then broken down to show that 58 percent of these requests were completed 1–30 days late, 22 percent 31–60 days late, 7 percent 61–90 days late and 13 percent more than 90 days late.

Number and length of time extensions taken, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011

This graphic is of two horizontal bar charts one, on top of the other, that represent the number and the length of time extensions taken by Transport Canada. The graph on top represents data from 2008–2009 while the bottom graph represents data from 2010–2011. Along the y-axis there are five categories. These categories are 31–90 days, 91–120 days, 121–150 days, more than 180 days and unspecified. The x-axis is the number of time extensions taken.

Transport Canada reported taking 70 extensions for 31–90 days in 2008–2009 and 36 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 14 extensions for 91–120 days and 24 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took three extensions for 121–150 days and seven in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 5 extensions for 151–180 days and 10 in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took two extensions for more than 180 days and four in 2010–2011. In 2008–2009, it took 14 extensions for an unspecified time and 44 in 2010–2011.

Number and outcome of delay-related complaints, 2008–2009 to 2010–2011

This graphic displays two horizontal bar charts, one on top of the other. The top chart represents deemed refusal complaints against Transport Canada. The bottom chart represents time extension complaints. Each chart is separated into thirds representing fiscal years 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. In each third, there are fo