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Appendix B: How the OIC determined the rating for each institution

A global rating is attributed to each federal institution as a means to measure its performance. This rating for the reporting period is based on several factors. As a starting point, we are assessing compliance with statutory requirements, namely whether requests were responded to within statutory timelines (deemed refusal ratio) and whether notices under subsection 9(2) were sent to the Information Commissioner. 

In addition to these statutory requirements, we are taking into account the practices and processes used by the institution that may impact, positively or negatively, its capacity to fulfill its obligations under the Act. Among these practices and processes, we have considered the average completion time and good practices. Contextual factors, such as variations in workload, will also be taken into account.

Overall grade

Factors

A (Outstanding)
  • 5% or less deemed refusals
  • In the case of deemed refusals, we will look at the delay to respond to requesters: most within 30 days
  • Compliance with subsection 9(2) (85% and more of extensions beyond 30 days were notified to the OIC)
  • Appreciation of the overall use of time extensions and average completion time: deemed appropriate
  • Comprehensive set of good practices in place to ensure that access requests are responded in a timely manner (proactive disclosure; informal disclosure; partial release; collaborative instruments, absence of requests categorization or no delay created by it, focus on service to the requesters, etc.)
  • Other elements which may impact the institution's capacity to comply with the Act and measures taken to deal with them (for example, increase in the workload of the institution and high volume of consultation requests received)
B (Above average)
  • 10% or less deemed refusals
  • In the case of deemed refusals, we will look at the delay to respond to requesters: most within 30 days
  • Compliance with subsection 9(2) (85% and more of extensions beyond 30 days were notified to the OIC)
  • Appreciation of the overall use of time extensions and the average completion time: in most instances, deemed appropriate
  • Comprehensive set of good practices in place to ensure access requests are responded in a timely manner
  • Other elements which may impact the institution's capacity to comply with the Act and measures taken to deal with them
C (Average)
  • 20% or less deemed refusals
  • In the case of deemed refusals, we will look at the delay to respond to requesters: most within 30 days
  • Compliance with subsection 9(2) (85% and more of extensions beyond 30 days were notified to the OIC)
  • Appreciation of the overall use of time extensions and the average completion time: to some degree, deemed appropriate
  • A number of good practices in place to ensure access requests are responded in a timely manner
  • Other elements which may impact institution's capacity to comply with the Act and measures taken to deal with them
D (Below average)
  • 20% or more deemed refusals
  • In the case of deemed refusals, we will look at the delay to respond to requesters: most beyond 30 days
  • Compliance with subsection 9(2) (less than 85 percent)
  • Concerns with the overall use of time extensions and the average completion time
  • Limited good practices in place to ensure access requests are responded in a timely manner
  • Other elements which may impact institutions' capacity to comply with the Act and measures taken to deal with them
F (Unsatisfactory)
  • 20% or more deemed refusals
  • In the case of deemed refusals, we will look at the delay to respond to requesters: most beyond 30 days
  • Compliance with subsection 9(2) (less than 85 percent)
  • Concerns with the overall use of time extensions and the average completion time
  • Practices in place to ensure access requests are responded in a timely manner are insufficient
  • Other elements which may impact institutions' capacity to comply with the Act and measures taken to deal with them

How the oic calculated the deemed refusal rate for each institution

The deemed refusal rate is the percentage of requests that the institution did not complete within the deadlines (30 days and extended) set out in the Access to Information Act. There are four categories of overdue request: requests entering the year overdue, requests completed after 30 days with no extension, requests completed after their extension expired, and requests that were still open at year-end and past their due date. The deemed refusal rate is calculated by dividing the total number of overdue requests by the total number of requests open during the year.

Here is an example:

Overdue requests carried over into 2010–2011 47
Requests completed after 30 days with no extension 18
Requests completed after their extension expired 24
Overdue requests carried over into 2011–2012 52
Total overdue requests 141
Requests carried over into 2010–2011 256
New requests in 2010–2011 1,259
Total open requests 1,515

Deemed refusal rate: 141 ÷ 1,515 = .093 x 100 = 9.3 percent